Internet dating scammers posing

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So how do you avoid falling prey to an internet dating scam in the first place?Take heed of the following red flags and you'll be much more aware, prepared and ready should someone try and take advantage of you.Some scammers are contacting the families of military members by phone or email and making false claims that their son or daughter is injured or wounded overseas.Grey says they sometimes ask for money for medical bills, but usually they are only contacting the family to scare them as an anti-war protest.They get caught up on these Internet scams, specifically targeted to them,” said Holly Petraeus, director of the Better Business Bureau’s military line and the wife of Gen. “To have somebody pick their pocket here at home is completely unacceptable.” Unacceptable ... “The majority of these scam artists come from African countries ... They set up a scam, work in a cyber café, and then move.” “They can take their website down and open up another one the next day.” Petraeus said. S Army Criminal Investigators Office becomes aware of an online military scam, they have to hand the case over to the country where the crime is committed, Grey said. In the past year there has been a surge of criminals posing as military members on online dating sites, forming relationships with women and ultimately asking for money.Grey cited one case where a woman took out a second mortgage on her home to finance her romantic interest overseas.

has the most robust and powerful military in the world, and though its fighting men and women can win wars, they often appear defenseless against popular online scams. Service members are targeted by websites that claim to offer special military discounts on everything from cars to apartments for rent. civilians under the same guise of patriotism, Christopher Grey, spokesman for the U. Scammers prey on the victims’ “kindness, patriotism and (sometimes) romance,” which compromises the good name of the military, Grey explained.

Similarly, others offer military members a special discount for serving their country.

More disturbingly, the scammers are offering low-priced vehicles because a U. military member who died in combat owned the vehicle and the family wants to get rid of it fast.

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) says scams like these usually require a wire transfer and promise free shipping.

The description of the cars is lifted from auto sites, and typically you can Google the vehicle ID number, to determine whether it’s a real deal or a hoax.

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